Wine for Mulled Wine

Wine for Mulled Wine

TLDR:

The best wine for mulled wine is a fruity wine that isn’t too tannic, as the tannins will get pulled out when heating and make the wine taste sour. Avoid full bodied, dry red wines. Here is a list of wine for mulled wine:

  • Black Box Sweet Red
  • Franzia Chillable Red
  • Dornfelder
  • Malbec
  • Garnacha
  • Lambrusco
  • Zinfandel
  • Shiraz
  • Pinot Noir
  • Port 

But, don’t forget that although Glühwein is usually made with red wine, white wine rosé can also be used. For a non-alcoholic Glühwein, try using apple cider or apple juice as your base. Suggestions for non-red wines include:

  • Semi – Sweet Riesling
  • Gewürztraminer
  • Pinot gris
  • Chenin blanc
  • Dry Spanish rosé 
  • White Zinfandel 
  • Grenache rosé

Best Wine for Mulled Wine

Glühwein (pronounced glue – vine), mulled wine, mulled spiced wine, or Glogg are all variations on the same theme – heated wine seasoned with sweet and aromatic spices. These spices include, to name a few, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, orange, and allspice.

There are many recipes for Glühwein, but the traditional Glühwein recipe calls for heating wine with sugar and spices.  Wine is simmered with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes Glühwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings.

While Glühwein is typically made with red wine, white wine or rosé can also be used. For a non-alcoholic Glühwein, try using apple cider or apple juice as your base.

Best Wine for Glühwein

While Glühwein is typically made with red wine, white wine or a rosé can also be used. The wine you choose is essential to good Glühwein.  You want a wine that is high in sugar content so it will be sweet, but not too sweet. A wine with good acidity is also important as it will help to balance the sweetness of spices like cinnamon and orange, which you will add to Glühwein.

I tend to stay away from dry, full bodied wines like Cabernet Sauvignon, as they can make the Glühwein too astringent.

It’s a common misconception that you need good wine in order to make Glühwein. That’s not true. Of course, good wine makes everything better, but because we’re so heavily changing the flavor by adding flavor forward spices using a good wine doesn’t make sense. 

Save the good wine for the guests. In my experience, and my research around the world has been extensive, Glühwein is best made with a cheap red wine. 

Use Franzia. Or a similar sweet, boxed red wine. Black Box wine also works great.

No joke. The best wine for Glühwein is a sweet or semi-sweet cheap wine. 

You’re going to season the wine heavily with aromatic and sweet spices that overpower the wine’s original flavor. No need to get fancy and show off your sommelier wine picking skills here.

Wine for Mulled Wine

When choosing a red wine for your Glühwein, look for something that is fruity and not too tannic. The best wine for Glühwein is a sweet red wine. I like to avoid full bodied, dry red wines. If you can’t stomach Franzia or the like, here is a list of other good varietals to try:

  • Dornfelder – Dornfelder is a German red wine that is known for its sweetness. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Blaufrankisch – Blaufrankisch is an Austrian red wine that is known for its fruity flavor. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Zweigelt – Zweigelt is an Austrian red wine that is known for its fruity flavor. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Garnacha – Garnacha is a Spanish red wine that is known for its fruity flavor. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Merlot – Merlot is a French red wine that is known for its smoothness. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Pinot Noir – Pinot Noir is a French red wine that is known for its smoothness. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Shiraz – Shiraz is an Australian red wine that is known for its spiciness. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Lambrusco – Lambrusco is an Italian red wine that is known for its sweetness. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Zinfandel – Zinfandel is an American red wine that is known for its fruity flavor. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein. 
  • Port – Port is a Portuguese red wine that is known for its sweetness. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein. 

These are some of the best red wines that you can use to make Glühwein. Each wine has its own unique flavor that can add something special to your Glühwein. Choose the wine that you think will taste the best and enjoy!

White Wine for Glühwein

Some of the best white wines for making Glühwein include:

  • Riesling – Riesling is a German white wine that is known for its sweetness. This makes it a great choice for Glühwein, as the sweetness will help to balance out the spices.
  • Pinot Gris – Pinot gris is a French white wine that is similar to Riesling in terms of sweetness.
  • Gewürztraminer – Gewürztraminer is another German white wine that is known for its sweetness. It is also a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Chenin Blanc –  Chenin blanc is a French white wine that is known for its sweetness. It is a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Moscato d’Asti –  Moscato d’Asti is an Italian white wine that is very sweet. It is a good choice for making Glühwein if you want a sweeter version. 
  • Prosecco – Prosecco is an Italian white wine that is not as sweet as the other wines on this list. Prosecco makes a particularly good Glühwein and adds a lovely festive fizz to the drink.

Rosé Wine for Glühwein

Rosé wine is also a good option for Glühwein. If you want to use a Rosé, look for one made with Grenache grapes. Choose a wine that is not too sweet and has good acidity. Some good choices include:

  • Grenache Rosé –  Grenache Rosé is a French red wine that is known for its fruity flavor. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • White Zinfandel –  White Zinfandel is an American red wine that is known for its fruity flavor. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein.
  • Dry Spanish Rosé –   Dry Spanish Rosé is a Spanish wine that is known for its dry flavor. It can be a good choice for making Glühwein. 

Finally, ff you want to get really creative, you could even try making Glühwein with sparkling wine or Champagne.

German Glühwein

Glühwein is not a complicated drink to make. But, traditional Glühwein is challenging to perfect. Today you don’t have to go to Germany to enjoy the glow of a cup of Glühwein. You can make your own using the curated Sam’s Glow cocktail kit, or track down the supplies on your own. 

The special Sam’s seasoning in Boozn’ Sam’s Glow Kit isn’t for sale anywhere else and took years of diligent research amongst wooden stands and blackened kettles through places like Austria, Germany, Finland and Sweden.

 

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Frequently Asked Questions About Glühwein

Frequently Asked Questions About Glühwein

What is Glühwein?

Glühwein (pronounced glue – vine), mulled wine, mulled spiced wine, or Glogg are all variations on the same theme – heated wine seasoned with sweet and aromatic spices. These spices include, to name a few, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, orange, and allspice.

There are many recipes for glühwein, but the traditional glühwein spiced wine recipe calls for heating wine with sugar and spices.  Wine is simmered with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes gluhwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings. 

Glühwein spiced wine is not a complicated drink to make. But, traditional Glühwein is challenging to perfect. Today you don’t have to go to Germany to enjoy the glow of a cup of gluhwein. You can make your own using the curated Sam’s Glow cocktail kit, or track down the supplies on your own. 

The special Boozn’ Sam’s Glow recipe isn’t for sale anywhere else and took years of diligent research amongst wooden stands and blackened kettles through places like Austria, Germany, Finland and Sweden. 

Is Glühwein the same as mulled wine?

Yes, Gluhwein means “Glow Wine” in German. Call it Glühwein, mulled wine, or Glogg. You’re speaking the same language. 

Can you get drunk on Glühwein?

Oh yes. It might taste like heated fruit punch but it’s made with wine, which means it has alcohol. The heating occurs below the boiling point so that none of that precious alcohol is evaporated. Oh course, non alcoholic versions to exist too. That’s called Kinder punch in Germany, or kid punch. 

What is Glühwein in English?

The word glühwein is a combination of glühen, which means “to glow,” and wein, which means “wine.” And that’s exactly what gluhwein does to you after a few cups. It glows in your cheeks and warms you from the inside out.

Is Glühwein from Germany?

Glühwein is from Germany. Glogg is from Scandinavia. Mulled Wine, that a loose English translation. All the same, with slight variations. 

Glühwein Recipes

Glühwein is traditionally made with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes gluhwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings. Below are several variations on Glühwein.

Blueberry Glühwein

Traditional Glühwein

Port Wine Glühwein

Glogg

Boozn’ Sam’s Glow

Blueberry Wine Glühwein

Blueberry Wine Glühwein

The word Glühwein (pronounced glue – vine) is a combination of glühen, which means “to glow,” and wein, which means “wine.” And that’s exactly what Glühwein does to you after a few cups. It glows in your cheeks and warms you from the inside out.

Glühwein, mulled wine, mulled spiced wine, or Glogg are all variations on the same theme – heated wine seasoned with sweet and aromatic spices. There are many recipes for Glühwein, but the traditional Glühwein recipe calls for heating wine with sugar and spices.

Blueberry Wine Glühwein is a twist on a delicious classic and involves using blueberry wine to naturally enhance and improve gluhwein, while cutting down on sugar. It’s a healthier alternative to traditional Glühwein and is a tasty treat that is sure to bring the warmth of the fire into your glass and belly, even on a cold day. 

Usually, wine is simmered with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes Glühwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings.

Finding a way to incorporate fruit wines is a novel take on a beverage I spent years thanklessly traipsing across Europe to research via diligent consumption sessions next to open fires, singing carolers, and against cold nights seemed like an essential. Plus, a fruit wine will cut down or eliminate the amount of sugar you need to add, depending on the sweetness of the wine.

What is Blueberry Wine?

Blueberry wine is a fruit wine fermented with fruit, instead of wine, which most people are used to.  The blueberry is a small, round berry that grows on a bush. The fruit is native to North America and has been used in wine making for centuries. The blueberry wine made today is a sweet, fruity wine that can be enjoyed on its own or with food.

The process of making blueberry wine begins with the fermentation of the berries. This can be done with either fresh or frozen berries. Once the berries have been fermented, they are then pressed and the juice is extracted. The juice is then filtered and usually blended with other wines to create a unique flavor. The final step in the process is bottling and aging the wine.

Blueberry wine has a variety of benefits that make it a popular choice among wine lovers. One of the most notable benefits is its ability to pair well with food. Blueberry wine can be enjoyed with a variety of different dishes, making it a versatile choice for any occasion. Additionally, blueberry wine has been shown to have health benefits due to its high antioxidant content.

Blueberry wine has a more intense and complex flavor but is less sweet than you’d expect for a fruit wine.  It’s made by fermenting blueberries with sugar and water, and sometimes adding yeast. The fermentation process can take weeks or even months. Blueberry wine is usually red or purple in color, and has a high alcohol content.

Blueberry Wine Glühwein

Making blueberry wine glühwein is easy. Blueberry wines add a natural sweetness and additional flavor complexity to your glühwein. Just follow a traditional Glühwein recipe, using blueberry wine in place of the red wine to make blueberry wine Glühwein. You can use any type of blueberry wine you like, but we recommend something semi-sweet or sweet for best results. One of the wines mentioned above will work perfect. When selecting a fruit wine, just make sure it is not too sweet. You want the German Glühwein to have a balance of sweetness and acidity.

For a blueberry wine Glühwein, you’ll need:

  • 1 bottle Blueberry wine

  • Sugar to taste

  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 8 allspice
  • 1 star anise (optional)

Steps:

1. Put all of the ingredients into a pot over med-low heat and stir until the sugar has dissolved.

2. You want to ensure your Glühwein is piping hot before serving.

3. Heat to a simmer. Do not bring to a boil or that will mess with the wine.

4. At that point, turn off the heat and let the mixture steep for about 10 minutes.  This will give time for the ingredients to mix and meld.

5. You can then either strain it or serve it as is.

6. If you want to keep it warm, put it back on the stove over low heat.

7. Serve in Glühwein mugs or glasses with blueberries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History of Glühwein

History of Glühwein

Glühwein originated in Germany as a story of survival and reprisal from a hard life, a life we can’t imagine. In truth, the hot mulled spiced beverage existed centuries before making its way to Germany. But, since traditional Gluhwein is synonymous with Germany that’s the history we’ll explore.

The history of glühwein is fascinating. Glühwein first noted appearance in Germany wasn’t until the early 1400’s, long after the pillage and death of Julius Caesar. Still, I have to imagine it existed before documentation. Either way, during the 14th and 15th century, the demographic profile still varied from many other European countries. 

Created on nights when the heat of day escaped into the open, cloudless sky and cold set in with a harshness that numbed fingers, toes, and faces, I imagine they heated wine over fires and seasoned it for taste.

Glühwein first noted appearance wasn’t until the early 1400’s. But, I have to imagine it existed before documentation, and the first recorded mention of gluhwein anywhere in the world was from centuries before that point.

During the 14th and 15th center in Germany, it’s estimated a little over 10% of the population lived in cities or towns at that time, with the majority still living and working farms. Germany’s economy was agricultural in nature, as opposed to trade and industry. The Germanic people was spread out across large swaths of farmland throughout the country. 

Their foray into heating and drinking hot, spiced wine more than likely came about out of necessity to stay warm against the bitter cold winters versus as a social exercise. The cold and poverty of many who farmed and now found themselves restricted in movement and bound as serfs by the nobles of the time to land they originally owned would drive anyone to drink. 

Today Glühwein, or mulled spiced wine is a memory and has moved far beyond the history of glühwein. The heated, spiced wine is synonymous with the Christmas season, a time of love, friends, happiness, and joy. A good cup of christkindl (Christmas) gluhwein transports you into that world. Gluhwein ascended in popularity through Christkindlmarkt, Christmas Markets, in Germany, places filled with holiday cheer and goodness. 

German Christmas Markets

Not much is known about the first Christkindlmarkts, or Christmas markets. We do know that they served as a place for farmers to sell their goods, and for people to come together and celebrate the holiday season. Over time, these markets became more and more popular, eventually becoming the staple of German Christmas culture that we know today.

With its rich history and unique traditions, it’s no wonder that the Christkindlmarkt has become a global phenomenon. Cities big and small in Germany take their town squares hostages for several weeks leading up to and through the holiday season in this seasonal farmers market.

Just like cities large and small in the United States have farmer’s markets, so, too, do Christmas Markets pop up throughout the entire country of Germany and Europe. At any of these markets you can find a local, with a recipe probably passed down for generations, stirring a pot blackened by open flames, and filled with gluhwein.

At these markets, you can purchase everything from handmade decorations to fresh foods and gluhwein. Some of the more popular Christkindlmarkts are in the bigger cities of Germany, including Nuremberg, Munich, Heidelberg, Dresden, Berlin, Frankfurt, and more.

So if you find yourself in Germany during the holidays, be sure to check one out! And if not, don’t worry – you can always find a Christmas market near you. Just keep an eye out for the telltale signs: twinkling lights, the smell of fresh gingerbread, and the sound of holiday cheer.

Glühwein Recipes

Glühwein is traditionally made with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes gluhwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings. Below are several variations on Gluhwein.

Check out a traditional glühwein recipe.

Or a fruit wine glühwein recipe.

Perhaps you should take Boozn Sam’s Glow Glühwein for a spin.

Pomegranate Glühwein

Pomegranate Glühwein

The word Glühwein (pronounced glue – vine) is a combination of glühen, which means “to glow,” and wein, which means “wine.” And that’s exactly what Glühwein does to you after a few cups. It glows in your cheeks and warms you from the inside out. Pomegranate glühwein is a unique twist on the traditional glühwein classic.

Glühwein, mulled wine, mulled spiced wine, or Glogg are all variations on the same theme – heated wine seasoned with sweet and aromatic spices. There are many recipes for Glühwein, but the traditional Glühwein recipe calls for heating wine with sugar and spices. 

Wine is simmered with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes Glühwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings.

Finding a way to incorporate fruit wines is a novel take on a beverage I spent years thanklessly traipsing across Europe to research via diligent consumption sessions next to open fires, singing carolers, and against cold nights seemed like an essential. Plus, a fruit wine will cut down or eliminate the amount of sugar you need to add, depending on the sweetness of the wine. This pomegranate glühwein is a tasty look at good old fashioned glühwein.

What is Pomegranate Wine?

Pomegranate wine has a tart, fruity flavor and is usually red or pink in color. That tart flavor melds uniquely with Gluhwein. The pomegranate fruit is rich in antioxidants and has many health benefits. Pomegranate wine is made from the juice of the pomegranate fruit, which is infused with traditionally created wine (from grapes).

The pomegranate fruit is native to Asia and has been used in traditional medicine for centuries. Pomegranate juice is a popular ingredient in Middle Eastern cuisine. The health benefits of pomegranate have been known for centuries. 

The fruit is a rich source of antioxidants, which are believed to protect cells from damage and may help to prevent various diseases. Additionally, pomegranate juice has been shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Pomegranate wine is a delicious way to enjoy the health benefits of this amazing fruit. If you’re looking for a healthy and delicious fruit wine, pomegranate wine is a great choice.

Pomegranate wine is made from the juice of the pomegranate fruit. The juice is fermented and then bottled. Pomegranate wine has a deep red color and a tart, fruity flavor.

Pomegranate wine is a healthy alternative to other types of alcohol. It contains no sugar or artificial sweeteners, and it’s low in calories. Additionally, pomegranate wine is a good source of antioxidants and polyphenols, which are believed to protect cells from damage and may help to prevent various diseases.

Pomegranate Glühwein

Just follow a traditional Glühwein recipe, using pomegranate wine in place of the red wine. You can use any type of pomegranate wine you like, but we recommend something semi-sweet or sweet for best results. One of the wines mentioned above will work perfect. When selecting a fruit wine, just make sure it is not too sweet. You want the German Glühwein to have a balance of sweetness and acidity. 

For a pomegranate wine Glühwein, you’ll need:

– 1 bottle Pomegranate wine

  • Sugar to taste
  • 1/3 cup water

– 1 orange, sliced

  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 8 allspice

– 1 star anise (optional)


Steps:

1. Put all of the ingredients into a pot over med-low heat and stir until the sugar has dissolved. 

2. You want to ensure your Glühwein is piping hot before serving. 

3. Heat to a simmer. Do not bring to a boil or that will mess with the wine.

4. At that point, turn off the heat and let the mixture steep for about 10 minutes.  This will give time for the ingredients to mix and meld.

5. You can then either strain it or serve it as is. 

6. If you want to keep it warm, put it back on the stove over low heat. 

7. Serve in Glühwein mugs or glasses with orange slices or cinnamon sticks.

Gluhwein made with Fruit Wine

Gluhwein made with Fruit Wine

Good Gluhwein includes the right mix of ingredients. The best Gluhwein recipes live in the heads of those stirring steaming wine in blackened pots at Christmas Markets throughout Europe. That’s why I went to those markets and did the thankless research of stumbling my way through wooden stalls and drinking at Apres Ski parties to bring you the recipes you can’t find anywhere else. 

One recipe, Gluhwein made with Fruit Wine I travel to the Midwest to find. I discovered a perfect compliment in the Cherry Wines of Door County, WI, but gluhwein made with any fruit wine will work. 

A delicious cherry or blueberry wine adds an extra dimension of flavor when combined with spices. Plus, a sweet fruit wine will cut down or eliminate the amount of sugar you need to add, depending on the sweetness of the wine.

What is Fruit Wine?

Fruit wines are made from fermenting fruit. Sounds simple. But, we often only think of wine as produced from grapes. Grapes aren’t the only fruit that can be fermented to produce wine, and lots of different berries and fruits contain the potential for wine greatness. 

Aside from grapes, other fruit wines you might see on store shelves (or winery menus) include:

– Apple wine

– Apricot wine

– Blackberry wine

– Cherry wine

– Peach wine

– Elderberry wine 

– Pomegranate wine

The process for making fruit wines is similar to that of grape wines, but with a few key differences. First, the fruit is crushed and the juice is extracted (usually through pressing). Then, yeast is added to begin the fermentation process. Once fermentation is underway, the new wine must be aged before it’s bottled and ready to drink. 

During aging, fruit wines often undergoes racking (a process of transferring the wine from one container to another) and fining (the addition of agents that clarifies the wine). Once these steps are complete, the fruit wine is ready to be enjoyed.

There are many different types of fruit wines on the market, so there’s sure to be one that appeals to your personal taste and pairs well with the other spices added to gluhwein. If you’re looking for a fruity, refreshing wine, try a white fruit wine like apple or apricot. For a richer, fuller-bodied fruit wine, go for a red variety like cherry or blackberry.

Fruit Wine Gluhwein

Just follow a traditional gluhwein recipe, using fruit wine in place of the red wine. You can use any type of fruit wine you like, but we recommend something semi-sweet or sweet for best results. One of the wines mentioned above will work perfect. When selecting a fruit wine, just make sure it is not too sweet. You want the German gluhwein to have a balance of sweetness and acidity. 

For a fruit wine Gluhwein, you’ll need:

1 bottle fruit wine

  • 1 bottle fruit wine
  • 2 sugar cubes
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 medium orange, sliced
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 8 allspice
  • 1 star anise (optional)

Steps:

1. Put all of the ingredients into a pot over med-low heat and stir until the sugar has dissolved. 

2. You want to ensure your gluhwein is piping hot before serving. 

3. The best method of determining if the wine is hot enough is the ol’ finger test. Stick a finger in and if the gluhwein is hot, you’re good. 

A note here. PLEASE DON’T BE SILLY. DON’T BURN YOURSELF BECAUSE THAT CAN HAPPEN. This temperature range help release the aromas of the spices without making the drink too hot. You also don’t want it burning the roof of your mouth off. 

4. At that point, turn off the heat and let the mixture steep for about 10 minutes.  This will give time for the ingredients to mix and meld.

5. You can then either strain it or serve it as is. 

6. If you want to keep it warm, put it back on the stove over low heat. 

7. Serve in mugs or glasses with pitted cherry, cranberry, raspberry, blueberry and a cinnamon stick. 

*If you want a truly festive Gluhwein, try making it with cranberry fruit wine. 

 It’s delicious.