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White Sangria Cocktail Recipe

White Sangria Cocktail Recipe

The Perfect White Sangria Cocktail Recipe:

You’re here for a white sangria cocktail recipe, so let’s get it. This recipe is modeled after our popular Santeria Sangria, which is a blend between traditional, Spanish sangria and a refreshing, unique Boozn Sam’s take in the form of floral notes that balance out the sweet fruit flavors.  

Ingredients:

  • A bottle of Pinot Grigio
  • 1/4 cup Elderflower liqueur
  • 1/2 cup Grand Marnier
  • 1 medium sized orange, sliced
  • 1/2 pint of fresh raspberries
  • 1/2 pint of strawberries, sliced
  • 1 lemon, sliced thin
  • Fresh Mint
  • Ice cubes

Assembly

  1. Slice your fruit. All of it. Large chunks will do. Put in a large pitcher.
  2. Add your bottle of wine
  3. Add your liquor. Note, the liquor adds tastes and fortifies. You can make this without extra liquor. Add another orange and a full pint of strawberries.
  4. Let sit for an hour (overnight is better.)
  5. Grab the glass of your choosing. Fill the glass half full with ice. Add your sangria.
  6. Garnish with your fresh mint. 
  7. Enjoy.

The Extended Version for making a White Sangria Cocktail Recipe

n this blog post, we’ll be sharing a sensational Orange White Sangria Cocktail recipe that will elevate your summer gatherings to new heights. Bursting with citrusy flavors and infused with the essence of the season, this cocktail is guaranteed to be a hit at any soirée. So, let’s embark on a journey to cocktail perfection and delight in the flavors of summer.

Sangria is best served chilled, allowing the flavors to meld together and develop over time. Many recipes recommend refrigerating the sangria for several hours or even overnight before serving to achieve the optimal flavor profile.

One of the great things about sangria is its versatility. You can customize it to suit your taste preferences and the ingredients you have on hand. Experiment with different fruits, wines, spirits, and sweeteners to create your own signature sangria masterpiece.

Ingredients:

  • A bottle of Pinot Grigio
  • 1/4 cup Elderflower liqueur
  • 1/2 cup Grand Marnier
  • 1 medium sized orange, sliced
  • 1/2 pint of fresh raspberries
  • 1/2 pint of strawberries, sliced
  • 1 lemon, sliced thin
  • Fresh Mint
  • Ice cubes

Assembly

  1. Slice your fruit. All of it. Large chunks will do. Put in a large pitcher.
  2. Add your bottle of wine
  3. Add your liquor. Note, the liquor adds tastes and fortifies. You can make this without extra liquor. Add another orange and a full pint of strawberries.
  4. Let sit for an hour (overnight is better.)
  5. Grab the glass of your choosing. Fill the glass half full with ice. Add your sangria.
  6. Garnish with your fresh mint. 
  7. Enjoy.

Final Notes:

The longer you let your white sangria cocktail recipe sit the stronger the flavors will infuse and the more intense your sangria will be. I like to let my drinks meld overnight. If you’re short on time, and want to skip the hassle of buying all the ingredients, buy the kit. Many of the ingredients are organic, and, since they are dried ingredients, they are more potent. You can get a great sangria in 10 minutes!

Aperol Spritz Recipe and Napoleon – Episode 11

Aperol Spritz Recipe and Napoleon – Episode 11

Podcast Summary:

“Anyway, I’ll Drink to That” is a Boozn Sam’s production, exploring the fun, quirky, and fascinating tales of drinks (The Aperol Spritz recipe in this episode) that define culture, history and the world. Every drink has a story to tell, and I’m going to tell it…as true as I can. Hosted by Sam, from Boozn Sam’s. Saddle up with a good cocktail and give me a few minutes of your time for a mystery surrounding a drink that changed the world.

TLDR; – The Aperol Spritz Recipe –

  • Double shot (3 oz) of Aperol
  • Double shot (3 oz) of Prosecco
  • A shot (1.5 oz) of club soda
  • Ice
  • And an orange wedge as a garnish.

Episode 11 Details:

The Aperol Spritz Recipe dates back to 1809 and the loss of Venetian Independence after 1,100 years in Italy through the conquest of Napolean Bonapart. 1,100 years of freedom. 1,100 years is older than the Roman Empire, 4 times older than the United States of America and 13.5 times the lifespan of the average human.

Transcript of Podcast:

*This is the entire podcast episode in written form. Do not read if you want the audio version to be spoiled.

The year was 1809 and the Italians were sick of it. What was it exactly? It’s an age old story, the battle of sovereign individual against the state. Being controlled. Being treated like chess pieces here to serve their masters. The last decade alone had been a trying one. 

Not only was this a time before modern medicine, where everything could, and usually did kill you. On top of that there was a tiny, nuisance of a man with a big complex. He took his tiny stature and swung himself throughout Europe, conquering and pillaging in the name of himself. But, this tiny man had a big military brain.

Napoleon rose to power the first time through a well orchestrated coup in France. That was in November of 1799. And by 1805 he’d renamed himself the Emperor of France, while also, at around that same time, crowning himself king of another kingdom, one he conquered.. 

Napoleon might have said his military campaigns were for France, but someone who compensated for his shortcomings as much as Napoleon did, didn’t have room for anyone else. We’ve all met people like this. And they suck…both the air out of every room they enter, and actually in real life as humans. Napoleon was no different, and, in fact, was such a narcissist that a phrase -The Napoleon Complex – actually bears his name. 

From the late 1790s on, he’d been working to wrestle Italian land away from Italy. And in 1805, he grasp a specific region in his grubby little fingers and ended an astonishing 1,100 years of Venetian independence by capturing the city of Venice. 

1,100 years. 

Take a moment and let that number sink in. 

For perspective, that’s almost 4 times older than the United States of America.

The famous Roman Empire lasted for less than 1,000 years.

That’s 13.5 times longer than the average human lifespan of 75 years.

So, given today’s life expectancy, which is higher than it was back then by quite a few years, that would represent over 13 generations.

13 generations of Italians lived and died in this independent city. 

Until Napoleon arrived and ripped it all away and turned the land over to the Kingdom of Italy. land…which was overseen by the, if you ask him, infallible, King of Italy – Napoleon himself.

During his campaigns through Italy he depleted the country, taking, in today’s prices, $12 million in jewels and precious metals, $45 million in funds, and over 300 pieces of priceless art. His military genius also led him to capture 150,000 Italian prisoners and over 500 cannons. 

So, when the Italian Pheasants finally got so sick of him they wanted to take action, he had a mighty war chest and a good chunk of the advanced world under his command. The war of 1809, the War of the Fifth Coalition, pitted Italian farmers on one side, who had aligned with the Austrians and Italian nobility on the other, who were aligned with France and Napoleon. 

In 1814 they secured partial success and became a separate kingdom of the Austrian Empire, which would prove on a turning point for many reasons, but, here, for only one reason that matters to us. The influence of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from this point on would create a new technique for making cocktails, that would end up being used to create many drinks in the distant future, including one, which is the subject of our story today. 

The Austro-Hungarian Empire was comprised of the Austrian Monarchy and the Hungarian Monarchy. It operated as a dual monarchy. Two kingdoms. One Monarchy to rule them both. 

And, just like France, it had a contested hold and desire to take this part of Italy as its own for quite some time. Napoleon just beat them to the punch. 

But, a fast way to turn your enemy into your friend is through the introduction of another enemy, one more powerful. One that’s wronged you more. 

So, when France took control of this Italian region…to Italian farmers, the Austro-Hungarian Empire weren’t looking so bad.

At this point, Napoleon had more enemies than friends, and wrestling back control of this land was possible. So it happened. And peace resumed. An unsettling peace, with the black mark of freedom that wasn’t true freedom lingering in the back of the minds of Italians.

It would be a generation later until this Italian region would return to Italy and move away from it’s proxy reign by the Austro-Hungarian empire. By this point the damage would have been done, over and over again, drink by drink, until the beverage that came into existence during the early and mid 1800’s, through 1860, became a cultural phenomenon. 

The damage would have also been done with the Austrians and Hungarians and the Seven Week War would signal the end of this dual monarchy. The Seven Week War has many other names too. But, it was basically was a civil war between Austria, Germany, Italy, Hungary, The Dutch, and even Russia. 

It was a great carving apart of a massive empire, and anytime great empires fall, great pain ensues. This time was no different. 

Germany called it the war of brothers…and, as friendships and familial bonds were stressed and broken, I’m sure it felt like that. 

Austrians during this time, and even before this time, when they were protecting Austro-Hungarian interests in Italy, needed something to pass the time and steady the nerves. So, they turned to drink, but not any drink. 

Because, you see, the wine in Italy was much stronger and harsher than what the sophisticated Austrians were used too…(or maybe it was the other way around).

Either way, they took to cutting the wine they drank in order to make it more palatable and, I’m assuming, win that most ridiculous and foolish of all games called “Whoever gets the drunkest wins.”

It didn’t take much altering to make the drinks appealing to the taste buds of the Austrians. Just a dash, really.

And dash after dash, led to a drink today, that’s extremely popular. 

But, before that dash and the other Italian liquor that would also be part of this cocktail, The Kingdom of Italy agreed to enter the Seven Week War on the side of Austria. Part of the deal was the ability to reclaim the region of ( (Ven – ah – too) Veneto, which had the 1,100 year old fallen free capital of Venice. 

And after the war ended, the Italians, so disgusted with Austria’s suggestion that Italy purchase the Ven – ah – toh region from them that they went to war for it.

I can imagine at this time the Austrians still stationed throughout the castles and fortifications of Italy, added a dash of water, once more to their strong Italian wine, cursed in German under their breath and picked up their weapons once more.

Eventually, after the end of the war the land went to France, as a neutral party, before it was reclaimed, at no cost besides thousands of humans lives, to Italy.

The Austrians hung around for a bit longer at the fortresses, no doubt trying to enjoy as much of the wine, dashed with a bit of water, as long as possible.

Upon their departure, they would leave behind, among many imprints, this dash of water, 

Which eventually turned into a dash of carbonated water,

Which they called by the original German name for splash

A spritz

And it would be this idea of diluting a strong flavored drink with a bit of water that would live on through 1940 and the creation of Aperol,

Which would then be used to create another unique drink with that bitter Italian liquor,

The Aperol Spritz Recipe

  • Equal parts Aperol and prosecco
  • A dash, a spritz, of soda
  • Ice
  • And an orange wedge as a garnish.

A refreshing drink that harbors none of the politics and fighting and death of a 1,100 year old independent republic

And all of the refreshing feel of freedom and uplifting effervescence 

That a small dash,

A spritz,

Can create. 

Anyway…I’ll drink to that. 

Whiskey Sour Recipe

Whiskey Sour Recipe

A whiskey sour is an easy to make drink with a base of whiskey, and kicked up another notch on the fancy ladder with mulled simple sugar instead of standard simple sugar.

Making mulled simple sugar is easy and a perfect addition in a whiskey sour.

Mulling spices include, to name a few, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, orange, and allspice. Our special Boozn Sam’s blend mulling spice packets are added to water and sugar and heated to create a tasty batch of mulled simple sugar.

Whiskey Sour

Ingredients:

Simple Syrup Recipe:

1.5 cups of water

.5 cups of sugar

1 Boozn Sam’s Glow Orange Spice Bag

Cocktail Recipe:

2 oz. shot of whiskey

1 oz. of lemon juice

2 oz. of mulled simple sugar

1 – Candied orange and cocktail skewer as a garnish

Directions:

1. Make the Simple Syrup by combing the water, sugar, and tea bags in a pot and bringing to a boil. Set aside and let cool

2. Add ice to a rocks glass then combine the whiskey, lemon, and mulled simple sugar

3. Garnish with the candied orange and cocktail skewer

4. Serve and enjoy

A Manhattan Drink and One Postal Code Town – Epi. 9

A Manhattan Drink and One Postal Code Town – Epi. 9

Podcast Summary:

“Anyway, I’ll Drink to That” is a Boozn Sam’s production, exploring the fun, quirky, and fascinating tales of drinks (The Manhattan Drink in this episode) that define culture, history and the world. Every drink has a story to tell, and I’m going to tell it…as true as I can. Hosted by Sam, from Boozn Sam’s. Saddle up with a good cocktail and give me a few minutes of your time for a mystery surrounding a drink that changed the world.

TLDR; – The Manhattan Drink

  • One part sweet Vermouth.
  • One part dry Vermouth.
  • One part Whiskey.
  • No bitters.
  • No cherries.

A stripped down, economical, and very fitting version of the Manhattan Drink created by residents of a small island off the coast of Germany. The full store is below in episode 9 of the podcast. 

Episode 9 Details:

Young Men by the Lonely Sea in a One Postal Code Country

The young men gathered, like they always gathered, and one of them was late. He knew the consequences for being late. He knew what would be asked of him and he didn’t have a choice but to take his punishment.

Transcript of Podcast:

*This is the entire podcast episode in written form. Do not read if you want the audio version to be spoiled.

The temperature hovered around freezing and Hans looked out at the water, which tumbled against the shore and left behind frozen ice peaks.

He stole a glance once more. The waves were loud today. They thundered when they crashed into the icy shore. The wind strong. And, although, he couldn’t see the sun, its departure turned the world crimson and crawled into the darkening blue sky.  

Hans tucked his hands deeper into his pockets and hunched his shoulders against the incoming wind. He’d be there soon and then it wouldn’t matter. Unless he was late. That would not be tolerated. This was a fickle bunch. 

He thought back to this past summer and when all of this started. He was only 24. He blamed his innocence. But, truth be told, it was curiosity, not innocence that sent him 3722 miles from home to a new home.

It was here that he found a home, far away from home, amongst many who spoke his same language and were, coincidentally from where he was from. Which, would not have been unusual except for the fact that he was from a small place. A country with one postal code. 

So, to find his people behind the counters of delis and retail markets throughout the bustling city was a bit odd, to say the least. What surprised him even more was finding the drink so popular back home, right here. 

It was surreal for him in many ways. Though he shouldn’t have been surprised.

When industry dried up back home many left and sought new opportunities to support their families. Their isolated community had little economic hope within its boundaries and venturing out was a necessity. A survival tactic.

His hometown had never been big but during those summer month’s it dwindled even more as all those capable and of working age left to earn money. They didn’t need a lot. But, they needed enough to survive. No place is devoid of trade. A reality of life is that money equals survival.

Money also paid for the delightful drink, served with equal parts of three distinct beverages, that these foreigners loved to drink. In fact, they loved it so much that in any given year the one postal code country saddles up to a very specific bar and drinks 70 gallons of this drink, which they have officially adopted as their national drink. Even though that might not sound like a lot it’s important to remember that Hans was one of less that 5,000 people in the city. That includes kids, adults and the aged population. Those 70 gallons a year…. Are also from one bar. 

Times have changed a lot since the drink was first discovered. Hans knows this, as he makes his way through the twilight streets of town. The biting cold bites harder as the sun sets further. He glances over his shoulder. Seeing no one, he continues on. 

It isn’t too much further now. And he better hurry up. The meeting will start soon. It wasn’t like anyone got invited either. This was a small group. A trusted group. Having to meet a specific criteria. 

The others would not tolerate a late arrival either. He’d pay for that…

He pushed those thoughts out of his mind and quickened his pace. The thought was terrifying for someone who comes from the history he does. 

Son to an openly bisexual mother, which was something considering it was 1935, great grandson to Ullrich, a general during WWI, and great-great grandson to Hinrich, a famous sea captain and nautical examiner, who also made his home right here. 

Times were different way back then. Those were the whaling days and he’d grown up on the stories. The hard life at sea hunting whales for the resources they could provide. It was a nasty, dangerous business. 

When you finally killed one of those animals that was easily as big as your ship, you then had to go about butchering the thing….at sea.

And the smells. He wrinkled up his nose. He could only imagine. But, he had heard the stench from the melting pots, that boiled fat over open flames, on the decks of ships in the middle of the ocean would permeate into your skin and stay with you.

It was no wonder that upon arriving to their final destination, a place greedy for the resources that these seafarers had, they took to a strong drink, after a strong shower, to settle the nerves after a long journey and start on a new journey of numbing pleasantness. 

Then, with pockets loaded down with coin, and having sucked up the energy of a place once fully alive, young, and brimming with possibility and hope for the world, they would ship out once more for home. 

And settle in for the cold winter months, which were too dangerous to be navigating the winter seas. In addition to their coin they brought back with them a drink and traipsed halfway around the world spreading bits of this delight with them whoever they went.

It was the classic dissemination of ideas and culture. The moving of something good from one place to another. This was before the internet. Before you could snap a photo and share it with all Nethers of the Earth in an instant. This was slow progress. A rising over decades. 

That ended in this one postal code country embracing a fad, which became a tradition, which became a heritage. 

With nothing to do during the cold months but rely on each other to survive, they did just that. The young men, full of energy, tamped down by the weather, needed an outlet. A way to move. To socialize. To stretch their muscles and smile a little. Maybe have some fun along the way too.

This created another fad. Which became another tradition. Which became another heritage. Complete with that same cocktail of three equal parts. Not exactly as it was made in New York, but stripped down to the essence, like the country these people lived. 

It was with this heritage that Hans finally arrived at a closed door, with warm light, and loud voices coming from the other side. He stood on the stoop for a moment. Looked left. Looked right. No one else was around. 

And why would they be? It was winter and after dark. This was an exclusive gathering. And he was late. He feared the consequences. But, there was nothing to do but face the music. 

So, with a sigh and, after a loud rapt on the door, he turned the knob and walked through. The light was bright and he squinted. All eyes turned to him. The place erupted with noise. A stampede of bodies moving toward him.

Claps on the back. 

Jostles. 

And threats. 

Threats for being late. 

Hans hung his head glumly, knowing what was to come next. 

He took the well used cocktail glass handed to him and stared into the light brown drink. He knew its contents by heart. 

It had made its way from New York, 3722 miles away, to this island off the coast of Germany. 

In unison the room raised their glasses, which all contained the same drink. The national drink of this tiny little, one postal code country called (Fure) Foehr. 

The Manhattan Drink

  • One part sweet Vermouth.
  • One part dry Vermouth.
  • One part Whiskey.
  • No bitters.
  • No cherries.

A stripped down, economical, and very fitting version of the Manhattan Drink. 

The drink that traveled across an ocean in the minds and bellies of whalers, 

who had turned into business owners in New York in the late 1800s. 

Where it found a passionate home

Amongst a few residents

And the regular happenings of (Wahl – Lu – John – Ken) hualewjonken

A gathering of men under the age of 30 during the winter months

That celebrates the times in centuries past when whalers, home for the winter, would also gather just like this, 

And throw back Manhattan drink

Anyway…. I’ll drink to that. 

Are Tea Bags Harmful?

Are Tea Bags Harmful?

Are tea bags harmful? It’s a fair question when you think about it. Tea bags are soaked in hot drinks, where their properties are infused into your beverage. A bag with harmful elements, and they are out there and used regularly, leads to chemical bleed, where those damaging ingredients end up in your drink, and ultimately, inside of you. Yuck.

Sam spent an entire year developing the perfect mulling spice blends for his winter Glow Kits and set a standard of excellence that has remained a pillar within the company to this day. If you’re going to do something, do it right and create something you’re proud to put your name on. Sam may like his drink, but he also likes being proud of a hard’s days work.

That obsession is seen in every detail in Boozn Sam’s products, even down to the tea bags. Because the bags you seep matter. Anything unsavory in that material ultimately ends up back in your body. And there are things to avoid too. Such as metal staples, harmful chemicals and microplastics.

This is also why, Boozn Sam’s uses unbleached bags made from plant fibers. No additional tastes or flavors. All of the goodness you’ve come to expect from having a high degree of integrity in the products Sam personally puts his name on.

Material of the Tea Bag

Some lower-quality tea bags may be made with materials that can release harmful substances when exposed to hot water. Some tea bags are made with paper that has been treated with epichlorohydrin, which is a compound that is considered a possible human carcinogen. However, safer materials now exist. Some tea bags are now made with biodegradable or organic materials.

Microplastics

Certain tea bags are made with plastic, and there is concern about the potential release of microplastics into the tea when hot water is added. This is more common with some silky or mesh tea bags. Microplastics can actually cause major brain issues, including anxiety, depression, and chronic fatigue.

Landfill Waste

Aside from non-biodegradable metal staples, tea bags that are made with a combination of plastic and paper will not decompose and end up in landfills, slowly deteriorating for the next hundred years. That’s good for no one. Not you. Not me. Not our future generation. Finally, have you considered the outer wrap? Although it may look cool, the outer, individual wrap that envelops each and every tea bag in your tea box, is waste. Unnecessary waste too, since it isn’t vacucum sealed and does little more than make the product look nicer.

The Perfect Bag

The perfect bag does exist, and we used it. It’s a natural filter that is biodegradable and unbleached. No tags. No strings. No outer wraps. You see, at the end of the day, your drink should be about…your drink. The rest is irrelevant, which is why we removed all the rest through careful though and research, leaving behind the pure essence of what you’re after – a damn good drink.

Christmas Slush Recipe

Christmas Slush Recipe

This Christmas slush is a variation of the classic brandy slush, which is popular throughout many parts of the midwest. And when made with Sam’s Glow mulling spice mixes, it’s easy!

Mulling spices include, to name a few, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, orange, and allspice. These spices, when added to slush make a delicious, unique, holiday slush. But, just don’t let the Christmas flavors fool you! This slush is good anytime the weather outside is cold, which may seem like a contradiction since it’s a cold drink. But, try it, and let us know what you think.

Christmas Slush

Ingredients:

*You will need a 1 gallon ice cream pail

Simple Syrup Recipe:

7 cups of water

2 cups of sugar

2 Boozn Sam’s Glow Cinnamon Spice Bag

Tea Recipe:

4 black tea bags

2 cups of water

Christmas Slush Recipe:

1 – 12 oz. can of concentrated orange juice

1 – 12 oz. can of concentrated lemonade

1 cup of butterscotch schnapps

2 cups of sweet red wine

1 bottle of squirt

Directions:

1. Make the Simple Syrup by combing the water, sugar, and tea bags in a pot and bringing to a boil. Set aside and let cool

2. Make the Tea by combining the tea bags and water and bringing to a boil. Set aside and let cool.

3. Make the Slush by combining the simple syrup, tea recipe, concentrated oj, concentrated lemonade, butterscotch schnapps and red wine.

4. Freeze for 24 – 36 hours

5. Serve by filled a cup half full with frozen Christmas Slush and topping off with squirt.

*Instead of squirt, see how to make a brandy christmas slush.