What is Gluhwein

What is Gluhwein

TLDR:

Gluhwein (pronounced glue — vine), mulled wine, mulled spiced wine, or Glogg are all variations on the same beverage — heated wine seasoned with sweet and aromatic spices. These spices include, to name a few, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, orange, and allspice.

There are many recipes for Glühwein, but the traditional Glühwein recipe calls for heating wine with sugar and spices.  Wine is simmered with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes Glühwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings.

While Glühwein is typically made with red wine, white wine or rosé can also be used. For a non-alcoholic Glühwein, try using apple cider or apple juice as your base. Some recipes also call for adding brandy or rum to the Glühwein. 

My personal favorite is a shot of butterscotch schnapps. The flavor complements sweet red wine and doesn’t get me hammered and laying on the floor drunk listening to Frank Sinatra in an hour. I buy an extra hour of sobriety.

Whether you’re making Glühwein from scratch using one of the recipes provided here or using a Glühwein mix, the key to great Glühwein is letting the Glühwein simmer long enough to let the flavors meld.  

Glühwein is not a complicated drink to make. But, traditional Glühwein is challenging to perfect. Today you don’t have to go to Germany to enjoy the glow of a cup of Gluhwein. You can make your own using the curated Sam’s Glow cocktail kit, or track down the supplies on your own. 

The special Sam’s seasoning in our glow kit isn’t for sale anywhere else and took years of diligent research amongst wooden stands and blackened kettles through places like Austria, Germany, Finland and Sweden. 

Find recipes here:

Boozn’ Sam’s Glow

Traditional Glühwein

Wassail (UK)

Glogg (Swedish)

What is Gluhwein?

Gluhwein (pronounced glue — vine) is a spiced, hot wine that is perfect for warming up on a cold winter’s day. The wine is heated slow, typically on the stove, but also over an open fire if you want to hearken back to the original days of making Glühwein.

The word Glühwein is a combination of glühen, which means “to glow,” and wein, which means “wine.” And that’s exactly what Glühwein does to you after a few cups. It glows in your cheeks and warms you from the inside out. Another theory on the name, is that it originated from the fires that glowed in the dark, cold nights when Glühwein first appeared in kettles over open fires.

Glühwein, mulled wine, mulled spiced wine, or Glogg are all variations on the same theme — heated wine seasoned with sweet and aromatic spices. There are many recipes for Glühwein, but the traditional Glühwein recipe calls for heating wine with sugar and spices.  Wine is simmered with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes Glühwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings.

While Glühwein is typically made with red wine, white wine or rosé can also be used. For a non-alcoholic Glühwein, try using apple cider or apple juice as your base. Some recipes also call for adding brandy or rum to the Glühwein. 

My personal favorite is a shot of butterscotch schnapps. The flavor complements sweet red wine and doesn’t get me hammered and laying on the floor drunk listening to Frank Sinatra within an hour of consumption.

Whether you’re making Glühwein from scratch using one of the recipes on Sam’s Booze or using a Glühwein mix like Sam’s Glow, the key to great Glühwein is letting the Glühwein simmer long enough to let the flavors meld.  Just ensure that when heating Glühwein you don’t let the wine boil, or it will change the flavor and alcohol content.

Good Gluhwein includes the right mix of ingredients. The best Glühwein recipes live in the heads of those stirring steaming wine in blackened pots at Christmas Markets throughout Europe. That’s why I went to those markets and did the thankless research of stumbling my way through wooden stalls and drinking at Apres Ski parties to bring you the recipes you can’t find anywhere else. 

Here are some complete recipes for traditional Bavarian Glühwein and Wassail.

The infusion of sweet and aromatic ingredients like oranges, cinnamon, alcoves overpower the wine flavor. Go with a sweet juicy wine, a light or medium bodied wine. Not something dry and full bodied.

This is less about terroir and more about experiencing a comforting, warm glass of spiced wine that hugs your tongue and plants little kisses down your throat and into your belly on a cold night. It’s the glow you’re after, the warmth in your soul that bakes out a core memory of time with family, loved ones, or friends.

We’ve got the luxury of progress to adapt the meaning of Glühwein. But, I believe the origin story of Glühwein saw a different use all together, one of survival not love. 

History of Glühwein

Gluhwein originated in Germany as a story of survival and reprisal from a hard life, a life we can’t imagine. In truth, the hot mulled spiced beverage existed centuries before making its way to Germany. But, since traditional Glühwein is synonymous with Germany that’s the history we’ll explore.

Gluhwein first noted appearance in Germany wasn’t until the early 1400s, long after the pillage and death of Julius Caesar. Still, I have to imagine it existed before documentation. Either way, during the 14th and 15th century, the demographic profile still varied from many other European countries. 

Created on nights when the heat of day escaped into the open, cloudless sky and cold set in with a harshness that numbed fingers, toes, and faces, I imagine they heated wine over fires and seasoned it for taste.

Gluhwein first noted appearance wasn’t until the early 1400s. But, I have to imagine it existed before documentation, and the first recorded mention of Glühwein anywhere in the world was from centuries before that point.

During the 14th and 15th center in Germany, it’s estimated a little over 10% of the population lived in cities or towns at that time, with the majority still living and working farms. Germany’s economy was agricultural in nature, as opposed to trade and industry. The Germanic people was spread out across large swaths of farmland throughout the country. 

Their foray into heating and drinking hot, spiced wine more than likely came about out of necessity to stay warm against the bitter cold winters versus as a social exercise. The cold and poverty of many who farmed and now found themselves restricted in movement and bound as serfs by the nobles of the time to land they originally owned would drive anyone to drink. 

Today Gluhwein, or mulled spiced wine is a memory. The heated, spiced wine is synonymous with the Christmas season, a time of love, friends, happiness, and joy. A good cup of christkindl (Christmas) Glühwein transports you into that world. Glühwein ascended in popularity through Christkindlmarkt, Christmas Markets, in Germany, places filled with holiday cheer and goodness. 

Not much is known about the first Christkindlmarkts, or Christmas markets. We do know that they served as a place for farmers to sell their goods, and for people to come together and celebrate the holiday season. Over time, these markets became more and more popular, eventually becoming the staple of German Christmas culture that we know today.

With its rich history and unique traditions, it’s no wonder that the Christkindlmarkt has become a global phenomenon. Cities big and small in Germany take their town squares hostages for several weeks leading up to and through the holiday season in this seasonal farmers market.

Just like cities large and small in the United States have farmer’s markets, so, too, do Christmas Markets pop up throughout the entire country of Germany and Europe. At any of these markets you can find a local, with a recipe probably passed down for generations, stirring a pot blackened by open flames, and filled with Glühwein.

At these markets, you can purchase everything from handmade decorations to fresh foods and Glühwein. Some of the more popular Christkindlmarkts are in the bigger cities of Germany, including Nuremberg, Munich, Heidelberg, Dresden, Berlin, Frankfurt, and more.

So if you find yourself in Germany during the holidays, be sure to check one out! And if not, don’t worry — you can always find a Christmas market near you. Just keep an eye out for the telltale signs: twinkling lights, the smell of fresh gingerbread, and the sound of holiday cheer.

Best Wine for Gluhwein

Use Franzia. Or a similar sweet, boxed red wine.

No joke. Slap that bag. The best wine for Gluhwein is a sweet, cheap red wine. 

You’re going to season the wine heavily with aromatic and sweet spices that overpower the wine’s original flavor. No need to get fancy and show off your sommelier wine picking skills here.

Go cheap and bountiful, because the final product is going to be a very drinkable, dare I saw chuggable, flavorful beverage.

The best wine for Glühwein is a sweet medium bodied red wine. I like to avoid full bodied, dry red wines. If you can’t stomach Franzia or the like, here is a list of other good varietals to try:

Dornfelder

Malbec

Garnacha

Lambrusco

Zinfandel

Shiraz

Any Blended Sweet Red 

Port 

FAQs

Is Glühwein the same as mulled wine?

Yes, Glühwein means “Glow Wine” in German. Call it Glühwein, mulled wine, or Glogg. You’re speaking the same language. 

Can you get drunk on Glühwein?

Oh yes. It might taste like heated fruit punch but it’s made with wine, which means it has alcohol. The heating occurs below the boiling point so that none of that precious alcohol is evaporated. Oh course, non alcoholic versions to exist too. That’s called Kinder punch in Germany, or kid punch. 

What is Glühwein in English?

The word Glühwein is a combination of glühen, which means “to glow,” and wein, which means “wine.” And that’s exactly what Glühwein does to you after a few cups. It glows in your cheeks and warms you from the inside out.

Is Glühwein from Germany?

Glühwein is from Germany. Glogg is from Scandinavia. Mulled Wine is a loose English translation. But, they are all the same, with slight variations. 

Glühwein Recipes

Glühwein is traditionally made with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus peel, cardamom pods and sugar. The addition of these warming spices makes Glühwein the perfect drink for chilly winter evenings. Below are several variations on Glühwein.

Boozn’ Sam’s Glow

Traditional Glühwein

Wassail (UK)

Glogg (Swedish)

Perfectly Peachy White Sangria Drink Recipe

Perfectly Peachy White Sangria Drink Recipe

This white sangria drink recipe is a twist on traditional sangria with the use of white wine instead of red wine. It has a unique flavors that differs dramatically from traditional red sangria. Often, white sangria drink recipes have a crisp and refreshing taste.

Take the below peach forward white sangria, for example. It’s made with Pinot Grigio wine, which is a great white wine sangria, and fresh fruits, this sangria recipe is sure to become a favorite at your next gathering. Let’s dive into the details of crafting this irresistible beverage.

Ingredients for a White Sangria Drink Recipe:

  • 1 bottle of Pinot Grigio white wine
  • 1/2 cup peach schnapps
  • 1/4 cup simple syrup
  • 1 cup peaches, sliced
  • 1 cup strawberries, sliced
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 1 lime, sliced
  • Fresh mint leaves for garnish
  • Ice cubes for serving

Instructions:

1. Prepare the fruits by washing and slicing

2. In a large pitcher, combine the white wine and elderflower liqueur. Stir well to ensure all the flavors are mixed. Then toss in the fruits and muddle them.

3. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours. More flavor, more time. Infuse overnight for more intense, delicious flavors.

4. When infused, add ice to glasses, mix in white sangria. Serve and enjoy!

*Want it extra boozy and with more flavor? Add in triple sec.

**Add lime or lemon seltzer water for some fizz.

White Sangria Drink Recipe:

Pinto Grigio is a classic white wine to use in white wine sangria. The addition of fresh peaches and peach schnapps add a refreshing fruity taste that is perfect on a hot summer day. Plus, the mint garnish balances the sweet peach well. Part of the joy of good sangria is the visual appeal too, and the color and added fruit to this recipe does not disappoint. Between the flavor and the look, this sangria is an experience to be enjoyed with your close friends and family during all your summer time fun.

Skip the DIY and save time by using Boozn Sam’s premade sugar-free Sangria kits.

 A Refreshing White Sangria Recipe

 A Refreshing White Sangria Recipe

A white sangria recipe is a twist on traditional sangria with the use of white wine instead of red wine. Sangria has ancient origins, with its roots tracing back to the Roman Empire. The Romans would mix water with wine to make it safe to drink, and they often added herbs and spices for flavor.

There’s no better way to cool down and unwind in the warm summer heat than with a glass of refreshing sangria, and if you are looking for something a bit different, than white sangria is yours answer.

Ingredients for a White Sangria Recipe:

  • 1 bottle of Pino Grigio wine
  • 1/2 cup of elderflower liqueur
  • 1 peach, sliced
  • 1 pint of strawberries, sliced
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • 1 lime, sliced
  • Fresh mint leaves for garnish
  • Ice cubes for serving

Instructions:

1. Prepare the fruits by washing and slicing

2. In a large pitcher, combine the white wine and elderflower liqueur. Stir well to ensure all the flavors are mixed. Then toss in the fruits and muddle them.

3. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours. More flavor, more time. Infuse overnight for more intense, delicious flavors.

4. When infused, add ice to glasses, mix in white sangria. Serve and enjoy!

*Want it extra boozy and with more flavor? Add in orange triple sec.

White Sangria Recipe:

White sangria is a delightful and refreshing beverage that embodies the essence of summer. With its crisp flavors, it’s the perfect companion for any outdoor gathering or lazy afternoon lounging by the pool. So gather your friends, raise your glasses and toast to the joys of summer with this tasty white sangria recipe.

Skip the DIY and save time by using Boozn Sam’s premade sugar-free Sangria kits.

Sangria Recipe

Sangria Recipe

Classic Sangria Recipe

This classic sangria recipe is rooted in Spain and dates back centuries. Sangria evolved from traditional Spanish wine punches and fruit-infused drinks and has been around since the Middle Ages. During that time, however; it was drank out of necessity, not fun.

The water quality was so bad during this time that wine was mixed with water as a way to purify it and make drinking it safer. The word “sangria” comes from the Spanish word “sangre,” meaning “blood,” and refers to the deep red color of traditional red sangria. The color is a good hint as to the quality of your sangria.

As Spain expanded and took over more of the world, Spanish wine became more widely available. Sangria evolved as a popular way to enjoy wine, especially among the working class, who mixed inexpensive wine with water, sugar, and whatever fruits were readily available to create a refreshing and flavorful beverage.

Over time, sangria became associated with social gatherings, celebrations, and fiestas throughout Spain. Its popularity grew beyond the borders of Spain during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as Spanish immigrants brought their cultural traditions, including sangria, to other parts of the world.

Today, Sangria has became synonymous with the vibrant and festive atmosphere of Spanish culture, and it began to appear on menus in restaurants and bars around the globe.

While sangria is enjoyed in many variations these days, if you want a delicious, traditional red sangria recipe, look no further.

Immerse yourself in the vibrant culture of Spain with our timeless Classic Red Sangria recipe. Inspired by centuries-old traditions and bursting with rich flavors, this iconic Spanish beverage is the perfect accompaniment to any fiesta or gathering. Join us as we journey through the sun-drenched streets of Spain and uncover the secrets to crafting the perfect glass of sangria.

Ingredients for a Sangria Recipe:

– 1 bottle of Rioja red wine

– 1/2 cup Spanish brandy

– 1/4 cup orange liqueur (such as triple sec or Cointreau)

– 1/4 cup simple syrup (adjust to taste)

– 1 orange, thinly sliced

– 1 lemon, thinly sliced

– 1 apple, thinly sliced

– 1/2 cup mixed berries (such as strawberries, raspberries, or blackberries)

– 1 cinnamon stick

– 2 cups lemon sparkling water (for fizz)

– Ice cubes for serving

How to make Sangria:

Let’s explore the step-by-step process for our sangria recipe

1. Thinly slice the orange, lemon, and apple. Wash and slice your mixed berries . Set aside for later use.

2. In a large pitcher, combine your rioja wine, Spanish brandy, orange liqueur, and simple syrup. Stir well to ensure all ingredients are thoroughly mixed.

3. Drop in the sliced orange, lemon, apple, mixed berries, and cinnamon stick. Give the mixture a stir.

4. Cover the pitcher with a lid and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Better is overnight. Allowing the sangria to chill allows the flavors to meld and results in a more vibrant and complex flavor profile.

5. Just before serving, pour in lemon sparkling water to add a refreshing fizz to the sangria. Stir to mix everything.

6. Fill glasses with ice cubes and pour Sangria over the ice. Garnish each glass with a slice of orange. Enjoy!

*Looking to shortcut the process and get all of the good and none of the bad? Check out our sugar free Sunny Sam Sangria Kits, many of which are organic, and all of which use environmentally friendly materials

Conclusion:

With its rich flavors and cultural significance, our Classic Sangria recipe is a celebration of Spain’s vibrant heritage. Whether you’re hosting a Spanish-themed party or simply craving a taste of tradition, this iconic beverage is sure to delight and impress your friends and family. So gather your loved ones, raise your glasses, and toast to the flavors of Spain with this sensational sangria recipe. Cheers!

Peach Sangria

Peach Sangria

Peach sangria is a refreshing and different alternative to traditional sangria. You might be thinking sangria is a simple party drink made with little effort and thought. Throw a few pieces of cut fruit in some red wine, dump in sugar, send a few text messages, eat a cut orange, take a pull of liquor and add some to the wine, stir and serve. If you are thinking Sangria is as simple as that – you would be partially correct.  

We’re not dealing with a specialty drink served at high end cocktail parties and sipped in evening gowns and tuxedos. There is little sophistication in the drink itself, which hints at the history of the beverage as a drink for common folks throughout early Europe. But, there is beauty in its simplicity.

What you might not realize is that Sangria’s simplicity means countless flavor profiles and combinations exist. You could make a red wine sangria recipe, or a white wine sangria , or a white peach sangria recipe, peach sangria, apple cider sangria, or even a thanksgiving sangria. 

I’m sure at this point your head is spinning. You came here for a recipe, dammit, not a diatribe on flavor profiles and 50 different sangria recipes. Or, maybe you did. 

I’ve done the hard work, put in the long hours on the sunniest beaches around the world, got chased by bulls in Spain while covered in Sangria remnants from prior nights of relentless research and, with a complete lack of orientation, aim and ambition over a quarter century, developed the perfect mix of booze in a variety of palette pleasing combinations.

And I’ve crafted some of the most popular variations of the fruity toot toot, party favor and some of the weirdest variations too. And, I tell you what, anyone can make homemade sangria, but not everyone can make homemade sangria that’s sugar free or low in sugar. My years of rigorous work in the field has led me to correlate more intense hangovers with sugar. Eliminate sugar and you eliminate the follow up pain and don’t totally wreck your body by putting shit food in it. C’mon here! Just because we’re drinking doesn’t mean we cannot also drink responsibly. Keep the fruit. Keep the Wine. Those are natural and good. Throw out the processed sugar. We’ll overthrow the sugar industry one glass of sangria at a time. At this point you almost have a moral obligation for your own health and the health of others to drink sangria and do some good. 

Peach Sangria

Flavor Profile:

One sip from this and you’ll notice the subtle hints of peach, which lift up the sweetness in a poetic, not Game of Thrones kill your brother sort of way. 

Drink this if you like to smell flowers on a mild summer day. It’s light and airy, and goes perfect on a lazy afternoon post coitus, when you’re relaxed, at peace, and need a greater sense of pleasure and fulfillment than what you just received.

Difficulty Level:

Our difficulty scale:

1 – Like falling asleep on the beach after a few glasses of capriccio sangria

5 – Like trying to put your shoes on after a few glasses of capriccio sangria

10 – Like trying to ride a bike, with a dog on a leash, and a bottle of half finished capriccio sangria in one hand, after a few glasses of capriccio sangria

This easy sangria recipe for peach sangria is quick to make and comes together easy. For that reason, it receives a rating of 3

Peach Sangria:

1 – .75L bottle of Syrah or Port wine

1/2 – lemon

1/2 cup – gin

1 cup – blueberries

1 – orange

2 – peaches

1 can – peach juice (sweeter) or peach seltzer (less sweet)

How to Make Sangria:

Dump that wine in a pitcher. Glug, glug, glug

Rinse the peaches, lemon and orange. Stop the spread of bacteria.

Quarter the peaches, lemon and orange, and plop in to the pitcher

Add the gin. Take a drink for yourself. I know this is hard work, but we’re halfway done and you’re doing awesome.

Add the blueberries

Add the peach juice or seltzer.

Stirrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Put in the fridge for a few hours for proper absorption to occur

Pour a glass of gin as a reward for your great work.